University of Wisconsin Madison
Tissue Mechanics (B M E 615) Syllabus
Course Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcome
  • 1
    Show proficiency of mechanics tools (those necessary to describe these complex materials). These include measures of stress, strain, stiffness, etc. and all supporting mathematics for typical nonlinear behaviors encountered in tissue mechanics. Metrics: homework problems, class discussions, exams.
  • 2
    Show proficiency describing mechanical behaviors of some prominent tissues that have mechanical roles in human physiology, i.e. connective tissue (bone, ligament and tendon, skin, etc.), skeletal muscle, as well as cardiovascular tissues (arteries, veins, valves, etc.). Metrics: homework problems, class discussions, exam.
  • 3
    Be able to reduce experimental data from testing observed by students and analyze it for biomechanical behavior. Metrics: lab reports and plots of mechanical behaviors.
  • 4
    Understand the basis of anatomy and physiology of each tissue under biomechanical consideration. Metrics: class discussion and exams
  • 5
    Understand why biomechanics is important for each tissue by discussing normal and pathological mechanics. Metrics: homework problems, class discussion and exams.
  • 6
    Understand the basics of cell mechanics including role of cytoskeleton, molecular motors and mechano-transduction affecting the dynamic reciprocity between the ECM and cells. Metrics: class discussion and exam
  • 7
    Demonstrate the ability to read current biomechanical literature in an area of interest, synthesize these papers to interpret what is known and limitations of current methods, and write a scientific paper summarizing this literature review and analysis. Metrics: Project paper
Details
Tissue Mechanics
B M E 615 ( 3 Credits )
Description
This course will focus on solid mechanics of prominent musculoskeletal and cardiovascular tissues. Their normal and pathological behaviors (stiffness, strength, relaxation, creep, adaptive remodeling, etc.) in response to physiolgic loading will be examined and quantified.
Prerequisite(s)
BME 315 or cons inst
Department: BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
College: College of Engineering
Instructor
Instructor Name
Instructor Campus Address
instructorEmail@emailaddress.edu
Contact Hours
2.5
Course Coordinator
RAY VANDERBY
Text book, title, author, and year

None required. The following books are used as references:

YC Fung, Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd ed. Springer, New York, 1993.

JD Humphrey and SL Delange, An Introduction to Biomechanics: Solids and Fluids, Analysis and Design, Springer, New York, 2004.

CR Ethier and CA Simmons, Introductory Biomechanics from Cells to Organisms, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge UK, 2007.

SC Cowin and SB Doty, Tissue Mechanics, Springer, New York, 2007.

RL Lieber, Skeletal Muscle Structure, Function, and Plasticity, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore MD, 2010.

VC Mow and R Huiskes, Basic Orthopaedic Biomechanics and Mechano-Biology, 3rd. ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore MD, 2005

Supplemental Materials
Several current scientific papers to illustrate topics under consideration are provided in pdf format and discussed. 
Required / Elective / Selected Elective
Selected Elective 
ABET Program Outcomes Associated with this Course
Program Specific Student Outcomes
(1) Understanding of biology and physiology as related to biomedical engineering needs.
(2) Ability to apply knowledge of advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), sciences, and engineering to solve problems at the interface of engineering and biology and to model biological systems
(3) Ability to design and conduct experiments, including making measurements and interpreting experimental data from living systems and addressing the problems associated with the interaction between living systems and non-living materials and systems
Brief List of Topics to be Covered

The course includes three major subsections, which are interrelated. 

  1. Mechanical tools (those necessary to describe these complex materials).
  2. Macroscopic mechanical behavior of some prominent tissues that have mechanical roles in human physiology, i.e. connective tissue (bone, ligament and tendon, skin, etc.), skeletal muscle, as well as cardiovascular tissues (arteries, veins, valves, etc.).  Their mechanical characteristics (such as stiffness, strength, relaxation, creep, adaptive remodeling, etc.) in response to loadings will be discussed.  An abbreviated anatomy and physiology of each tissue under biomechanical consideration are discussed, but focus is upon the mathematical formulation and constitutive equations that phenomenologically define observed mechanical behaviors. 
  3. Mechanics of cell including role of cytoskeleton, molecular motors and mechano-transduction affecting the dynamic reciprocity between the ECM and cells.
Additional Information
 
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